Here at our CUSEF blog, we share news, updates and stories about China and the United States – the two most important nations of the world. We provide more than a cursory glimpse of what’s going on between the two powers - here, we offer an in-depth look into their current state of affairs.

Traveling with CUSEF
What Our Alumni Say: Diversity in China
2018-09-23
Julie Yang, 2018 CUSEF Georgetown University Student Delegate
Julie Yang, 2018 CUSEF Georgetown University Student Delegate
Julie Yang from Georgetown University: “From the two female scholars at the Shanghai Institutes for International Studies to the retired PLA General, I was taken by the confident and insightful women we met throughout the trip. That being said, like many parts of the world, much progress is needed for the country to achieve greater female representation at the highest levels of government.” Read More
Traveling with CUSEF
What Our Alumni Say: Understanding China's Strategic Goals
2018-09-21
Peter Wilder, 2018 CUSEF Georgetown University Student Delegate
Peter Wilder, 2018 CUSEF Georgetown University Student Delegate
Peter Wilder from Georgetown University: “The recent China Study tour organized by CUSEF and the Georgetown Initiative for US-China Dialogue has given me a fantastic insight into the minds of our largest competitor. During this trip I was able to get a sense of the strategic overall goals of China, as well as an insight into the cultural background of this key player on the world stage.” Read More
Traveling with CUSEF
What our alumni says: Bullet Train, Electronic Bus & Drive for Sustainable Growth
2018-09-19
Koffi Apegnadjro, student of the Bronx Community College
Koffi Apegnadjro, student of the Bronx Community College
Koffi Apegnadjro from Bronx Community College: “Renewable and sustainable energy system technologies and products are needed to be developed in China and the developing parts of the world, utilizing current and future methodologies and technologies, motivates me to have a biochemical energy systems engineering study discipline. China has plans to eradicate the use of fossil fuel for energy by investing in the renewable energy technology system more than any county on earth. The lithium-ion battery technology is mostly use in their electronic vehicles but the efficiency of the battery needs to be improved.” Read More
Traveling with CUSEF
What Our Alumni Say: A New Dimension of the Country Unfolded
2017-10-06
Jonah Langan-Marmur, 2017 CUSEF Georgetown University Study Group China Visit delegate
Jonah Langan-Marmur, 2017 CUSEF Georgetown University Study Group China Visit delegate
Jonah Langan-Marmur from Georgetown’s School of Foreign Service: Along with welcoming exchanges with foreigners, the extent to which China is positioning itself to fulfil a global leadership role was surprising, if not slightly alarming. At the foreign ministry, while they did stress that American power meant that a “vacuum” in the Pacific did not exist, they eyed at least economic leadership on the Asian continent, and mentioned their “economic assistance” in Africa and Latin America. Alibaba stressed their capability in building global trade and logistics networks and promoted their plan to export their Chinese-inspired model to other communities. At the IPE we learned of new data-driven methods to keep corporations in check and enforce environmental rules, a service which has already been extended to other companies outside of China. China’s positive dedication to exporting domestic models of development and leadership to the global stage came across strongly. Read More
Traveling with CUSEF
What Our Alumni Say: Idea of “Authentic” China
2017-08-22
Jasmine Rogers, 2017 CUSEF Georgetown University Study Group China Visit Delegate
Jasmine Rogers, 2017 CUSEF Georgetown University Study Group China Visit Delegate
Jasmine Rogers from Georgetown University: “The relationship between China and prosperity is one that I thought about during the trip, particularly in relation to the idea of an “authentic” China. Authenticity was a recurring theme in discussions with my fellow delegates. We had a very upscale experience - staying in beautiful hotels, eating at world-renowned restaurants, being chauffeured around each city, multiple private guides, and access to institutions that most visitors to China would not have. Is this real China? I think conflating authenticity with rural and/or impoverished conditions promotes a form of Orientalism that strips China of its complexity and its economic progress. Tens of millions of Chinese people live in cities and have lifestyles that are comparable to those in the West; denying this reality promotes a distorted view of China.” Read More